Providence Athenaeum - Providence, RI

LENDING LIBRARY

Educational Technology maintains a number of highly useful print resources. We often use these resources when consulting with instructors about courses and refer to them when preparing for workshops and other events.

These books are available to be checked out from EdTech for extended periods of time, much like a standard lending library. Curtis Laws Wilson Library may, or may not, also have access to the resources listed below. Stop by EdTech (102 Centennial Hall) and see what's available!

In addition to being able to checkout the resources from EdTech, it may be possible to obtain the book from another source, such as Amazon online retailer, a free ebook, or through the University of Missouri library system (MERLIN).

Resource is available at Amazon.com

Resource is available as an ebook available for free. Download and start reading!

Resource is available through MERLIN (online library catalog connecting entire University of Missouri System).

NOTE: Links to the resources below may point to more recent editions of the books. The cover art of the book indicates which edition is currently available from the EdTech office.


We design to elicit responses from people. We want them to buy something, read more, or take action of some kind. Designing without understanding what makes people act the way they do is like exploring a new city without a map: results will be haphazard, confusing, and inefficient. This book combines real science and research with practical examples to deliver a guide every designer needs. With it you’ll be able to design more intuitive and engaging work for print, websites, applications, and products that matches the way people think, work, and play.


Weinschenk, S. (2011). 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know about People. Berkeley, CA: New Riders.


The only book to cover active learning in the middle or secondary classroom, this is a sourcebook of hundreds of instructional strategies to engage students in learning for any subject. KEY TOPICS: Specific, practical strategies include ways to get students active from the start through activities that build teamwork and immediately get them thinking about the subject matter. 101 activities include ice-breakers for the beginning of class, strategies for the middle of a lesson, and concluding exercises to foster student reflection and future application. In addition, these activities are designed to enliven learning, deepen understanding, and promote retention. Designed for the preservice and inservice teacher, this book is effective for anyone teaching in middle schools, high schools, colleges, and centers for adult education. For professionals working in middle school/secondary school education.


Silberman, M. L. (1996). Active learning: 101 strategies to teach any subject. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon


"Peggy Maki's text as a whole represents a comprehensive and realist approach to assessment and constructs a notion of assessment that is an uncommon blend of the pragmatic and sustainable, meaningful and valuable, theoretical and practical. Maki has artistically drawn together esoteric, philosophical foundations with pragmatic, real-world applications from which nearly any assessment practitioner will benefit…The second edition of Assessing for Learning verges on being a seminal work in higher education assessment scholarship." - The Review of Higher Education


Maki, P. L. (2004). Assessing for Learning: Building a Sustainable Commitment Across the Institution. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, LLC.


This revised and greatly expanded edition of the 1988 handbook offers teachers at all levels how-to advise on classroom assessment, including:

  • What classroom assessment entails and how it works.
  • How to plan, implement, and analyze assessment projects.
  • Twelve case studies that detail the real-life classroom experiences of teachers carrying out successful classroom assessment projects.
  • Fifty classroom assessment techniques.
  • Step-by-step procedures for administering the techniques.
  • Practical advice on how to analyze your data.

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers.


This is a perfect resource for all educators seeking research on the best strategies for raising student achievement through classroom instruction. A guide for educators of students in K-12, readers will find a wealth of research evidence, statistical data, and case studies. Nine categories of instructional strategies that maximize student learning are introduced, along with the pertinent information to understand and synthesize each:

  • Studies in effect size and percentile gain units.
  • Guiding principles for using the strategies.
  • Classroom examples of model instructional practice.
  • Charts, frames, rubrics, organizers, and other tools—will help teachers to apply the strategies immediately in the classroom.

Marzano, R. J., Pickering, D. J., & Pollock, J. E., (2001). Classroom Instruction that Works: Research-based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.


How does classroom management affect student achievement? What techniques do teachers find most effective? How important are schoolwide policies and practices in setting the tone for individual classroom management? In this follow-up to What Works in Schools, Robert J. Marzano analyzes research from more than 100 studies on classroom management to discover the answers to these questions and more. He then applies these findings to a series of "Action Steps"—specific strategies that educators can use to:

  • Get the classroom management effort off to a good start.
  • Establish effective rules and procedures.
  • Implement appropriate disciplinary interventions.
  • Foster productive student-teacher relationships.
  • Develop a positive "mental set."
  • Help students contribute to a positive learning environment.
  • Activate schoolwide measures for effective classroom management.

Marzano and his coauthors Jana S. Marzano and Debra Pickering provide real stories of teachers and students in classroom situations to help illustrate how the action steps can be used successfully in different situations. In each chapter, they also review the strengths and weaknesses of programs with proven track records. With student behavior and effective discipline a growing concern in schools, this comprehensive analysis is a timely guide to the critical role of classroom management in student learning and achievement.


Marzano, R. J., Pickering, D. J., & Pollock, J. E., (2003). Classroom Management that Works: Research-based Strategies for Every Teacher. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.


Treating information as it applies to technical communication, with a special emphasis on computer-centric industries, this volume delves into the role of information design in assisting with concepts, such as usability, documenting procedures, and designing for users. Influential members in the technical communication field examine such issues as the application of information design in structuring technical material; innovative ways of integrating information design within development methodologies and social aspects of the workplace; and theoretical approaches that include a practical application of information design, emphasizing the intersection of information design theories and workplace reality. This collection approaches information design from the language-based technical communication side, emphasizing the role of content as it relates to complexity in information design. As such, it treats as paramount the rhetorical and contextual strategies required for the effective design and transmission of information.

Content and Complexity: Information Design in Technical Communication explores both theoretical perspectives, as well as the practicalities of information design in areas relevant to technical communicators. This integration of theoretical and applied components make it a practical resource for students, educators, academic researchers, and practitioners in the technical communication and information design fields.


Albers, M. J., & Mazur, B., (2003). Content and Complexity: Information Design in Technical Communication. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.


When it was first published in 1997, The Course Syllabus became the gold standard reference for both new and experienced college faculty. Like the first edition, this book is based on a learner-centered approach. Because faculty members are now deeply committed to engaging students in learning, the syllabus has evolved into a useful, if lengthy, document. Today's syllabus provides details about course objectives, requirements and expectations, and also includes information about teaching philosophies, specific activities and the rationale for their use, and tools essential to student success.


Grunert O'Brien, J., Millis, B. J., & Cohen, M. W., (2008). The Course Syllabus: A Learning-Centered Approach. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.


Learn to design interest-provoking writing and critical thinking activities and incorporate them into your courses in a way that encourages inquiry, exploration, discussion, and debate, with Engaging Ideas, a practical nuts-and-bolts guide for teachers from any discipline. Integrating critical thinking with writing-across-the-curriculum approaches, the book shows how teachers from any discipline can incorporate these activities into their courses. This edition features new material dealing with genre and discourse community theory, quantitative/scientific literacy, blended and online learning, and other current issues.


Bean, J. C. (2011). Engaging Ideas: The Professor's Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.


The information age has brought about many ways for educators to help their students learn, creating an atmosphere where the learners desire flexibility in the way they learn. Modern students expect on-demand, high-quality learning environments that allow them to have more say in what and how they learn. Flexible Learning in an Information Society uses a flexible learning framework to explain the best ways of creating a meaningful learning environment. This framework consists of eight factors institutional, management, technological, pedagogical, ethical, interface design, resource support, and evaluation and a systematic understanding of these factors can create successful flexible learning environments. Gathering the knowledge of leading researchers from around the world, Flexible Learning in an Information Society presents a broad understanding of the emerging field of flexible learning and provides guidance in creating these environments.


Khan, B. H. (2006). Flexible Learning in an Information Society. Hershey, PA: Information Science Publishing.


Games create engagement—the cornerstone of any positive learning experience. With the growing popularity of digital games and game-based interfaces, it is essential that gamification be part of every learning professional's tool box. In this comprehensive resource, international learning expert Karl M. Kapp reveals the value of game-based mechanics to create meaningful learning experiences. Drawing together the most current information and relevant research in one resource, The Gamification of Learning and Instruction shows how to create and design games that are effective and meaningful for learners.

Kapp introduces, defines, and describes the concept of gamification and then dissects several examples of games to determine the elements that provide the most positive results for the players. He explains why these elements are critical to the success of learning. The Gamification of Learning and Instruction is based on solid research and the author includes peer-reviewed results from dozens of studies that offer insights into why game-based thinking and mechanics makes for vigorous learning tools. Not all games or gamification efforts are the same, the gamification of learning and instruction requires matching instructional content with the right game mechanics and game thinking. Moving beyond the theoretical considerations, the author explores how to design and develop gamification efforts. Kapp discusses how to create a successful game design document and includes a model for managing the entire game and gamification design process.


Kapp, K. M. (2012). The Gamification of Learning and Instruction: Game-based Methods and Strategies for Training and Education. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.


Helping is a fundamental human activity, but it can also be a frustrating one. All too often, to our bewilderment, our sincere offers of help are resented, resisted, or refused—and we often react the same way when people try to help us. Why is it so difficult to provide or accept help? How can we make the whole process easier?

The moment of asking for and offering help is a delicate and complex one, fraught with inequities and ambiguities. Schein helps us navigate that moment so we avoid potential pitfalls, mitigate power imbalances, and establish a solid foundation of trust. He identifies three roles a helper can play, explaining which one is nearly always the best starting point if we are to provide truly effective help. So that readers can determine exactly what kind of help is needed, he describes an inquiry process that puts the helper and the client on an equal footing, encouraging the client to open up and engage and giving the helper much better information to work with. And he shows how these techniques can be applied to teamwork and to organizational leadership.


Schein, E. A. (2011). Helping: How to Offer, Give, and Receive Help. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.


Any conversation about effective teaching must begin with a consideration of how students learn. However, instructors may find a gap between resources that focus on the technical research on learning and those that provide practical classroom strategies. How Learning Works provides the bridge for such a gap.

In this volume, the authors introduce seven general principles of learning, distilled from the research literature as well as from twenty-seven years of experience working one-on-one with college faculty. They have drawn on research from a breadth of perspectives (cognitive, developmental, and social psychology; educational research; anthropology; demographics; and organizational behavior) to identify a set of key principles underlying learning--from how effective organization enhances retrieval and use of information to what impacts motivation. These principles provide instructors with an understanding of student learning that can help them see why certain teaching approaches are or are not supporting student learning, generate or refine teaching approaches and strategies that more effectively foster student learning in specific contexts, and transfer and apply these principles to new courses.


Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How Learning Works: Seven Research-based Principles for Smart Teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.


From an early age, it is drilled into our heads: Restlessness, distraction, and ignorance are the enemies of success. We’re told that learning is all self-discipline, that we must confine ourselves to designated study areas, turn off the music, and maintain a strict ritual if we want to ace that test, memorize that presentation, or nail that piano recital.

But what if almost everything we were told about learning is wrong? And what if there was a way to achieve more with less effort?

In How We Learn, award-winning science reporter Benedict Carey sifts through decades of education research and landmark studies to uncover the truth about how our brains absorb and retain information. What he discovers is that, from the moment we are born, we are all learning quickly, efficiently, and automatically; but in our zeal to systematize the process we have ignored valuable, naturally enjoyable learning tools like forgetting, sleeping, and daydreaming. Is a dedicated desk in a quiet room really the best way to study? Can altering your routine improve your recall? Are there times when distraction is good? Is repetition necessary? Carey’s search for answers to these questions yields a wealth of strategies that make learning more a part of our everyday lives—and less of a chore.

By road testing many of the counterintuitive techniques described in this book, Carey shows how we can flex the neural muscles that make deep learning possible. Along the way he reveals why teachers should give final exams on the first day of class, why it’s wise to interleave subjects and concepts when learning any new skill, and when it’s smarter to stay up late prepping for that presentation than to rise early for one last cram session. And if this requires some suspension of disbelief, that’s because the research defies what we’ve been told, throughout our lives, about how best to learn.

The brain is not like a muscle, at least not in any straightforward sense. It is something else altogether, sensitive to mood, to timing, to circadian rhythms, as well as to location and environment. It doesn’t take orders well, to put it mildly. If the brain is a learning machine, then it is an eccentric one. In How We Learn, Benedict Carey shows us how to exploit its quirks to our advantage.


Carey, B. (2014). How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens. New York, NY: Random House.


To most of us, learning something "the hard way" implies wasted time and effort. Good teaching, we believe, should be creatively tailored to the different learning styles of students and should use strategies that make learning easier. Make It Stick turns fashionable ideas like these on their head. Drawing on recent discoveries in cognitive psychology and other disciplines, the authors offer concrete techniques for becoming more productive learners.

Memory plays a central role in our ability to carry out complex cognitive tasks, such as applying knowledge to problems never before encountered and drawing inferences from facts already known. New insights into how memory is encoded, consolidated, and later retrieved have led to a better understanding of how we learn. Grappling with the impediments that make learning challenging leads both to more complex mastery and better retention of what was learned.

Many common study habits and practice routines turn out to be counterproductive. Underlining and highlighting, rereading, cramming, and single-minded repetition of new skills create the illusion of mastery, but gains fade quickly. More complex and durable learning come from self-testing, introducing certain difficulties in practice, waiting to re-study new material until a little forgetting has set in, and interleaving the practice of one skill or topic with another. Speaking most urgently to students, teachers, trainers, and athletes, Make It Stick will appeal to all those interested in the challenge of lifelong learning and self-improvement.


Brown, P. C., Roediger III, H. L., & McDaniel, M. A. (2014). Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.


This indispensable handbook provides helpful strategies for dealing with both the everyday challenges of university teaching and those that arise in efforts to maximize learning for every student. The suggested strategies are supported by research and adaptable to specific classroom situations. Rather than suggest a "set of recipes" to be followed mechanically, the book gives instructors the tools they need to deal with the ever-changing dynamics of teaching and learning.


McKeachie, W. J., (1999). McKeachie's Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers (10th Ed.). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company.


For the Internet generation, educational technology designed with the brain in mind offers a natural pathway to the pleasures and rewards of deep learning. Drawing on neuroscience and cognitive psychology, Michelle Miller shows how attention, memory, critical thinking, and analytical reasoning can be enhanced through technology-aided approaches.


Miller, M. D. (2014). Minds Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.


Recent advances in brain science show that most students’ learning strategies are highly inefficient, ineffective or just plain wrong. While all learning requires effort, better learning does not require more effort, but rather effectively aligning how the brain naturally learns with the demands of your studies. This book shows you what is involved in learning new material, how the human brain processes new information, and what it takes for that information to stick with you even after the test.

Taking a small amount of time to read and act upon the material in this book will prove to be one of the best decisions you can make as a learner. What you discover will change the way you learn in college and will be helpful in your personal and professional life. You live in a world where you will have to be a lifelong learner, constantly updating your skills and changing jobs to compete in the global marketplace. Most college students today will have as many as 10-14 different jobs by age 38. Learning how to learn in harmony with your brain is crucial to your long-term success.

This succinct book explains straightforward strategies for changing how you prepare to learn, engage with your course material, and set about improving recall of newly learned material whenever you need it. This is not another book about study skills and time management strategies, but instead an easy-to-read description of the research about how the human brain learns in a way that you can put into practice right away.


Doyle, T., & Zakrajsek, T. (2013). The New Science of Learning: How to Learn in Harmony With Your Brain. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, LLC.


Presents an entirely new approach to introductory physics within a calculus-based conceptual and a mathematical framework. It offers an approach to presenting the material that is more gradual than existing books on the subject. Peer Instruction: A User's Manual develops the full conceptual framework of each chapter within the first section of that chapter while addressing questions common to that topic. The material in this section concentrates on the underlying ideas and paints the big picture, whenever possible without equations. The second part of each chapter then develops the rigorous mathematical framework linked to the material presented in the first part. Each chapter also includes a short set of qualitative, conceptual questions at the end of the first section designed to strengthen the focus on the conceptual framework and facilitate understanding of the mathematical framework. The book is written in a lively, engaging style that anticipates the questions readers will have, articulates them, and answers them in a direct dialogue with the reader. 


Mazur, E. (1997). Peer Instruction: A User's Manual. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc.

NOTE: Dr. Mazur was the opening keynote speaker for Teaching and Learning Technology 2011.


The undergraduate years are a turning point in producing scientifically literate citizens and future scientists and engineers. Evidence from research about how students learn science and engineering shows that teaching strategies that motivate and engage students will improve their learning. So how do students best learn science and engineering? Are there ways of thinking that hinder or help their learning process? Which teaching strategies are most effective in developing their knowledge and skills? And how can practitioners apply these strategies to their own courses or suggest new approaches within their departments or institutions? Reaching Students strives to answer these questions.

Reaching Students presents the best thinking to date on teaching and learning undergraduate science and engineering. Focusing on the disciplines of astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, geosciences, and physics, this book is an introduction to strategies to try in your classroom or institution. Concrete examples and case studies illustrate how experienced instructors and leaders have applied evidence-based approaches to address student needs, encouraged the use of effective techniques within a department or an institution, and addressed the challenges that arose along the way.

The research-based strategies in Reaching Students can be adopted or adapted by instructors and leaders in all types of public or private higher education institutions. They are designed to work in introductory and upper-level courses, small and large classes, lectures and labs, and courses for majors and non-majors. And these approaches are feasible for practitioners of all experience levels who are open to incorporating ideas from research and reflecting on their teaching practices. This book is an essential resource for enriching instruction and better educating students.


Kober, N. (2012). Reaching Students: What Research Says about Effective Instruction in Undergraduate Science and Engineering. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press.


Keeping students involved, motivated, and actively learning is challenging educators across the country,yet good advice on how to accomplish this has not been readily available. Student Engagement Techniques is a comprehensive resource that offers college teachers a dynamic model for engaging students and includes over one hundred tips, strategies, and techniques that have been proven to help teachers from a wide variety of disciplines and institutions motivate and connect with their students. The ready-to-use format shows how to apply each of the book's techniques in the classroom and includes purpose, preparation, procedures, examples, online implementation, variations and extensions, observations and advice, and key resources.


Barkley, E. F. (2010). Student Engagement Techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.


This revision of Bloom's taxonomy is designed to help teachers understand and implement standards-based curriculums. Cognitive psychologists, curriculum specialists, teacher educators, and researchers have developed a two-dimensional framework, focusing on knowledge and cognitive processes. In combination, these two define what students are expected tolearn in school. Like no other text, it explores curriculums from three unique perspectives-cognitive psychologists (learning emphasis), curriculum specialists and teacher educators (C&I emphasis), and measurement and assessment experts (assessment emphasis). This "revisited" framework allows you to connect learning in all areas of curriculum. Educators, or others interested in Educational Psychology or Educational Methods for grades K-12.


Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (Eds.). (2001). A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. New York, NY: Addison Wesley Longman, Inc.


Rethink traditional teaching methods to improve student learning and retention in STEM

Educational research has repeatedly shown that compared to traditional teacher-centered instruction, certain learner-centered methods lead to improved learning outcomes, greater development of critical high-level skills, and increased retention in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

"Teaching and Learning STEM" presents a trove of practical research-based strategies for designing and teaching courses and assessing students' learning. The book draws on the authors' extensive backgrounds and decades of experience in STEM education and faculty development. Its engaging and well-illustrated descriptions will equip you to implement the strategies in your courses and to deal effectively with problems (including student resistance) that might occur in the implementation. The book will help you: Plan and conduct class sessions in which students are actively engaged, no matter how large the class is Make good use of technology in face-to-face, online, and hybrid courses and flipped classrooms Assess how well students are acquiring the knowledge, skills, and conceptual understanding the course is designed to teach Help students develop expert problem-solving skills and skills in communication, creative thinking, critical thinking, high-performance teamwork, and self-directed learning Meet the learning needs of STEM students with a broad diversity of attributes and backgrounds

The strategies presented in "Teaching and Learning STEM" don't require revolutionary time-intensive changes in your teaching, but rather a gradual integration of traditional and new methods. The result will be continual improvement in your teaching and your students' learning.


Felder, R.M., & Brent, R. (2016). Teaching and Learning STEM: A Practical Guide. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

NOTE: Dr. Richard Felder and Dr. Rebecca Brent have both been opening keynote speakers at our Teaching and Learning Technology Conference (Dr. Felder in 2013 and Dr. Brent in 2014).


Digital cameras offer exciting new possibilities for the classroom. They are affordable, students love the technology, and they can be used to address curricular objectives in all of the core content areas. This first-of-its-kind book from ISTE shows you how. Experienced practitioners and L&L authors Glen Bull and Lynn Bell bring together all the technical, curricular, and logistical strategies you'll need to make effective use of digital cameras. Subject area experts demonstrate how to use these nifty tools for data collection, scientific visualization, mathematical analysis, and digital storytelling, covering both content area standards and the NETS-S. Get started today!


Bull, G. L. & Bell, L. (Eds.). (2005). Teaching with Digital Images: Analyze, Acquire, Create, Communicate. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.


Since the publication of the first edition of this best-selling guide, the author has mentored hundreds of faculty and conducted workshops around the world on the preparation and use of teaching portfolios. This continued practical involvement with portfolios provides a steady stream of new perspectives which are incorporated into a completely updated second edition.

This new edition includes:

  • Getting started and maintaining effective use of the portfolios
  • Choosing items for the portfolios
  • The key role of the mentor
  • Using portfolios for improving teaching and for personnel decisions about tenure, promotion, and retention.
  • How portfolio revisions improve teaching
  • and much, much more...

The Teaching Portfolio, 2nd Ed offers college and university faculty and adminisrators the kind of practical, research-based information necessary to foster the most effective use of portfolios. it is is written for presidents, provosts, academic vice presidents, deans, department chairs, instructional development specialists, and faculty--the essential partners in evaluating and improving teaching.


Seldin, P. (1997). The Teaching Portfolio: A Practical Guide to Improved Performance and Promotion/Tenure Decisions (2nd Ed.). Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing Company, Inc.


In hindsight, every great idea seems obvious. But how can you be the person who comes up with those ideas?

In this revised and expanded edition of his groundbreaking Thinkertoys, creativity expert Michael Michalko reveals life-changing tools that will help you think like a genius. From the linear to the intuitive, this comprehensive handbook details ingenious creative-thinking techniques for approaching problems in unconventional ways. Through fun and thought-provoking exercises, you’ll learn how to create original ideas that will improve your personal life and your business life. Michalko’s techniques show you how to look at the same information as everyone else and see something different.

With hundreds of hints, tricks, tips, tales, and puzzles, Thinkertoys will open your mind to a world of innovative solutions to everyday and not-so-everyday problems.


Michalko, M. (2006). Thinkertoys: A Handbook of Creative-Thinking Techniques (2nd Ed.). Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press.